Archive | April, 2012

Confessions of Suburban IBCLCs: You Know You Are a Lactation Consultant When…

25 Apr

…You aren’t home, your husband answers a call from a breastfeeding mom and knows what breastpump to recommend to her.

…Your son’s teacher tells him she wants to talk to me about breastfeeding but HIS translation is “Miss McGillicuddy needs help with her nipples.”

…You could hand express anything that has milk in it.

…You find yourself obsessing over the creation of the perfect, crocheted demo breast.

…You perform reverse pressure softening on yourself while describing it to a desperate mom over the phone.

…Your doctor’s nurse, while there for your annual check-up, asks you to palpate a lump in her nipple and give your opinion on what it might be.

…Your jaw doesn’t drop when you see nickel-sized nipples attached to watermelon-sized breasts on a mom with a 6 pound baby because you know nipples and breasts come in all shapes and sizes.

…You can keep a professional face when a client tells you her pediatrician’s nurse, or better yet, her pediatrician tells her that her six week old baby only needs to nurse 6 times a day and should be sleeping through the night.

…You are no longer uncomfortable with your children overhearing your telephone conversations about sore nipples and engorgement. You figure someday when they are parents they will need the info too!

 …Though you’re not a man, you make “eye” contact with every woman’s breasts before her eyes as you contemplate her breastfeeding experience or her plans to breastfeed.

…You can somehow relate every life moment back to breasts and breastfeeding.

…You learn something from every mom you meet!

…You can’t sleep or “wind” down after a consult….on a lactation high for hours!!

…You are not afraid to join a mom having a good post-partum cry.

…You have been know to literally do the “happy dance” through your house when you get a message from a mom who just days before was in tears and desperate for help but today is enjoying breastfeeding and in no pain!!

...And you are not afraid to celebrate with a mom as she reaches personal milestones along her breastfeeding journey.

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What Are You Afraid Of?

18 Apr

 A lesson from a two-year-old…

In January, our families had the opportunity to spend New Year’s Day together at a beautiful house located on about 40 acres of land.  Behind the house, the yard sloped down into a small pond, low from the dry year we had.  The ground was covered with pine needles and crunchy leaves…beautiful landscape but tough for little feet to navigate through.

Our nine kiddoes had a blast exploring, riding four-wheelers, shooting their BB guns and putting kindling on the fire (all safety precautions in place!).

Later in the afternoon, Leah’s two-year-old Ryan was carrying a football out back, and as I watched, he started toward that slippery, pine-needle covered slope.  Leah was standing at the bottom of the slope at the water’s edge.  I called out to her to keep a close eye because I was afraid he was going to slip and roll right down into the water.  Well, slip he did, but it wasn’t him who rolled down into the water, it was the football.  He wasn’t about to lose that football, so he began running after it, oblivious to mine and his mom’s cries to stop as we both tried to catch up to him…because he wasn’t stopping!

Straight into the shallow water he went with total abandon as he literally dove after that ball.  Leah grabbed him up, and he was perfectly fine besides being wet and cold (which we remedied right away).  He didn’t even shed one tear, the expression on his face was sheer determination, like he had blinders on…there was no thought, no fear, just one goal:  GET THAT BALL!

Can you remember the last time you “ran after” something with no thought, no fear, just total abandon?  What’s standing in your way?  Are you afraid to get your feet wet?  Being a momma isn’t easy…it requires getting your feet wet once in a while.  Mother without fear…you can always change your shoes, but you can’t turn back the clock.

Who’s Feeding Momma? 10 Ways to Support a Breastfeeding Mom

16 Apr

1. Share your successful breastfeeding stories and experiences and leave the negative experience or breastfeeding “horror stories” for another person……a new mom is already emotionally full as she processes her birth experience and contemplates motherhood…she is full of desire to be successful at breastfeeding and bonding with her new baby.  Offering stories of challenges may not fill her with the inspiration she needs, especially if she is struggling…..certainly let her know she is not alone even if there are struggles but adding to the list of “what if” and “could that happen to me” worries is probably going to have a negative effect.

2. Bring her food!! And NO it does not have to be bland and boring just because she is breastfeeding. Most nursing babies have no problem with any foods a mother eats even spicy or bold flavors. You could ask a mother about her preferences but don’t hold back on foods she enjoys. Or make her easy-to-grab, healthy snacks that she can store in her nursing nest and can eat while she feeds the baby!

3. Pamper mom!! Bring her some flowers to brighten the room, offer a foot rub or shoulder massage or bring her some chamomile tea to relax. Fill Momma’s love tank so she can fill baby’s!!!

4. During a feeding help her relax.….if you are present for a feeding, and you see mom getting tense, some gentle relaxation reminders can be helpful! Sometimes her shoulders creep up to her ears. Reminding her to relax and encouraging a few deep breaths can even help with the milk letting down!

5. Ask her what tasks around the house would help reduce her stress.….often times offering to hold the baby or take the baby so she can rest will only stress the mom more or make her feel inadequate as a mother. What may enable her to relax and focus on the baby is clearing the kitchen sink or doing some laundry. Straightening a room or walking the dog? Ask her!!

6. Be the gate keeper…..the early days of learning to breastfeed are usually filled with fumbling and adjusting as mom and baby learn the dance of latching. Mothers may find it hard to manage and focus if there are many visitors stopping in. Help decrease visitors, and you may also want to hold off on long visits until she requests it or feels up to them!

7. Send encouraging texts and emails….let her know how proud you are of her efforts to breastfeed, her dedication to breastfeeding, her amazing mothering abilities…….a simple text like ” You are an awesome mom and every drop of breastmilk you give your baby is a precious gift!” can carry her to through a long feeding at 2 am or a round of evening cluster feedings!

8. If she needs help…help her find good help…..IBCLC’s are the gold standard for  lactation care, bring her a list of local IBCLC’s to call on if she is having any issues!

9. Look up her local chapter of La Leche League and help her get to a meeting! Mother to mother breastfeeding support is invaluable…..she needs to feel like she is not alone…..even if everything is going well, it is good to meet other like-minded moms doing all the same things she is!

10. Help educate others around the new mother about ways to help support her! If you are reading this blog, there is a strong likelihood that you have a new mom in your life…..pass this blog on to others in her life as well.  Create a “village” around this new mom to inspire and support her on the journey of breastfeeding her baby.  Each child we see breastfed in this generation will contribute to a healthier and happier world in the next!!

No Perfect Houses Allowed: Preparing For Your Lactation Consultation

9 Apr

*Don’t clean! As lactation consultants,  our focus is on mom and baby.  We won’t be looking at the piles of laundry or dishes in the sink.  Leave the tidying up for the in-laws and even then wait at least a month…..

*Dress For Comfort Not Style.  PJs are totally ok!  Just wear a top with easy access so you won’t have to worry about it getting in the way of your breastfeeding efforts.

*Tuck Your Pets Away.  Or ask us before the visit if we mind the pets being out.  Sometimes dogs and cats are so friendly they want to be in middle of the consult.  Although Rover and Mr. Whiskers are cute, they can be a distraction for momma, and we want you to feel relaxed throughout the consult and not concerned about the pets sniffing out the new visitors and their strange bags. 🙂

*Expect to Breastfeed.  But don’t hold off a feeding if your baby is hungry before we arrive.  They are usually always willing to eat again.  It’s helpful if you can text us when you expect the baby to feed next, and we may be able to adjust our schedule around the feeding!

*Pick a location.  Decide where you will be most comfortable breastfeeding…couch, recliner, bed…and have pillows, burp cloth, receiving blanket and a bottle of water within reach.

*Write Down Your Questions.  Don’t try to remember them…your new mom brain won’t let you.  Take a couple of minutes the day of the consult to make a list of questions and concerns you may have.  We won’t leave until we know that you have had all of your questions addressed. 

*Plan payment.  Feel free to ask ahead of time the specifics about fees and payment methods so it’s not a source of worry and surprise for you at the conclusion of the visit.  You or preferably your partner may also want to contact your insurance company to see if any of our services are reimbursable to you or can be applied to a flex spending account.

*Get Your Pump Out.  If you are using a pump at the time of the consult, have it available for us to look at so we can make sure the fit is good for you and provide you tips for getting the most out of your pumping sessions.

*Talk With Your Support Person.  And ask them if they might be available to listen in on the consult and watch techniques.  Having another set of eyes and ears present ensures that when we leave you will feel confident in their ability to give you gentle reminders of the techniques and tips you learned during the consult

*Get Baby in Skin to Skin.  Plan to have your baby dressed in just a clean diaper and spend a few minutes with her on your chest, heart to heart, before our arrival. Babies who are held in skin to skin just prior to feeding go through a specific set of feeding behaviors which generally enables them to latch and breastfeed more efficiently.

*Relax.  And give yourself a pat on the back for seeking help.  While we can’t always provide an immediate fix (sometimes those magic lactation wands just don’t work), our goal is to leave you with a plan, feeling empowered and more confident to take charge of your breastfeeding journey.

Before You Breastfeed: 10 Tips for New Breastfeeding Moms

2 Apr

1. Learn about and use Laid-back breastfeeding technique. This approach taps into your baby’s feeding instincts. Your baby is capable of latching and feeding well at the breast.

2. Have a list of things others can do to help you when they come to visit. If visitors must come in the early weeks have a list posted on the refrigerator of small tasks that YOU would find helpful and reduce your stress. Usually someone else holding the baby is not as helpful as someone running a load of laundry or fixing a meal or changing the sheets on your bed. Don’t be afraid to ask for help; your job is to spend time with your baby learning about her, feeding her and resting.

3. Spend as much time as possible in skin to skin. Having skin to skin time with your baby has amazing effects on the both of you. Science has proven that skin to skin contact with mom and baby stabilizes baby’s temperature and heart rate, helps mother identify early feeding cues, and helps mother bond more deeply with her baby.  Get comfy in a recliner or bed, have baby down to diaper and lay her on your chest heart to heart. You can put a blanket over her back and just relax. Baby may rouse and search for the breast or may fall comfortably to sleep with the familiar sound of your beating heart.

4. Learn about how to know your baby is feeding well. One of the biggest concerns new mothers have is whether or not their baby is getting enough from breastfeeding. Following are some signs to look for:

  • Your baby has adequate diaper output.
  • Your baby wakes to nurse on their own.
  • Your baby is alert and active when feeding.
  • You hear or see baby swallowing as they feed.
  • Your baby is gaining weight well.
  • You may also notice your breast feel softer after a feeding and/or you may notice a let down during a feeding or milk dripping from the other breast.

5. Find or recruit a support system. One of the major reasons women quit breastfeeding before they expect to is a lack of support from family and friends, and research tells us the spouse/partner plays the biggest role. If you are struggling in the early weeks, having family members and supportive friends to lean on and who will encourage you will help you reach your breastfeeding goals.

6. Find a breastfeeding support group early on. Breastfeeding support groups, like La Leche League or hospital based groups, are a valuable resource for help and support in the early weeks of breastfeeding.

7. Don’t forget to take care of yourself. Often times moms are so exhausted they forget to eat or drink frequently. Having snacks that you can grab quickly are life savers. You will feel your best if you are also making sure you are resting often and getting plenty to eat and drink.

8. Get help early on if things are not going well. Many moms are reluctant to get help or not sure where to find help with breastfeeding issues, but getting help early is so important! Many times minor issues can turn into major problems if help is not found early on. Getting qualified help is the key when facing challenges. An International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC) is the highest accredited breastfeeding helper and has proven skills to assist in many of the common breastfeeding challenges. But not all Lactation Consultants are IBCLC’s so be sure to ask!

9. Take a prenatal breastfeeding class. Find a class that is taught by an IBCLC, and attend early in your third trimester.  Often times, classes taught in other locations besides hospitals will focus on prevention of problems and provide more practical breastfeeding information rather than teaching “this is how we do it at XYZ Hospital.”  Consider a private class to get the most customized experience.

10. Build your portable nursing nest. Whether you decide to have a special place to nurse your baby or nurse in different locations throughout the house, having a basket of self-care items within hand’s reach is invaluable.  Here’s a list of things you may want to include in your portable nursing nest:

  • Water bottle – If you forget it, you will feel like you just trekked through the Sahara…
  • Healthy snacks – High protein, high fiber, tasty snacks to keep you satisfied…
  • Cell phone – You will get very adept at texting while nursing…
  • iPod, mp3 Player – Relaxing music…increased relaxation helps those breastfeeding hormones flow better…
  • Burp cloth – For little spits and leaking milk…
  • Breast pads – Disposable or reusable…
  • Lanolin – Your choice of nipple cream, such as Earth Mama or MotherLove, all-natural ingredients…
  • Book/Magazine – Or these days, Kindle, Nook or eReader…
This is YOUR time with YOUR baby…learning together…slow down, relax and enjoy!
*photo courtesy of www.007b.com